Society Still Has A Lot To Learn

Illustration by Eduardo Badal.
EDUARDO BADAL / THE REPORTER

Society has come a long way. Today, we are more understanding and accepting, and we no longer discriminate based on what’s on the surface. Most of society has surpassed all the bias and inequality that once ruled us. But this progress does not excuse the fact that there is still room to grow. There is still a large number of people who continue to hold on to the prejudice instigated centuries ago.

So, why is society still racist, misogynistic and homophobic?

We don’t need to look at such serious issues to see that many people are moving forward while plenty are still living in the past. Tattoos are a simple and valid example.

Throughout history, tattoos have been marks that only delinquents or gang members had. This would explain the obvious negative connotation that was present when referring to tattoos in the past. Today, tattoos have become a social norm that many individuals from all kinds of races, ages and professions wear. Tattoos are often even seen as works of art.  

Regardless of their popularity, many people don’t completely agree with the stigma surrounding tattoos. The issue comes from the notion that one individual feels superior to another because of a mark that resides on the other person’s body. Obviously, the pressing issue stems from more serious matters such as the racism, misogyny and homophobia that is still present.

If we can’t come together as a society to agree that tattoos don’t make you any less of a person than your ink free counterpart, how will we ever look past the discriminations that are as old as time?

Millennials are probably the most criticized generation, but we are the most accepting. We have learned to not only tolerate, but to accept those who are different than us. We know better than our ancestors did. Sadly, it seems that a lot of us want to continue with the old tradition of tearing each other down. We need to come together and overcome this hatred and ignorance. If most of us now see a symbol that once was affiliated with gang activity as art, why can’t we do the same to learn our other differences?

Let’s continue to move forward and make society a more cohesive and inclusive environment and here’s a challenge— learn to love our distinct inks.

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