$5,000 Worth Of Cameras Stolen From North Campus’ School Of Justice

Twenty-five cameras used to document crime scene investigations were stolen from a classroom at North Campus, according to a public safety report. 

Among the stolen items were 22 Canon Powershot portable cameras and three Canon Rebel Ti cameras. The equipment is valued at $5,000. 

The theft was reported on Sept. 12 at noon by criminal justice professor Sharon Plotkin, who noticed the cameras were missing from a locked cabinet in Room 8337. Plotkin said, in the public safety report, that the cameras are used by a class that is taught at night in the same room. 

No classes were affected by the theft, according to Raimundo Socorro, dean of the School of Justice, Public Safety, Law Studies at North Campus.   

There are no plans to replace the stolen cameras. 

“We have more,” Socorro said. “I haven’t been told we need more.”

The cabinet was locked with a key that is only available to School of Justice administration and faculty, Socorro said. According to Plotkin’s statement to public safety, she hadn’t used the equipment since the fall semester of 2018 and other professors in the department said they hadn’t seen the cameras either. 

When reached by The Reporter, Plotkin said she would rather not comment on the matter. 

No signs of forced entry into the cabinet were discovered. There are currently two security cameras in the vicinity that face the classroom and six security cameras on the third floor of the 8000 building, according to Fermin Vazquez, senior director of campus administration at North Campus. 

At this time, it is unclear whether the College found anything on the security footage. Vazquez said MDC disposes of surveillance footage 30 days after they are filmed.

No arrests have been made in the case, according to Miami-Dade Police. An active investigation is being led by Miami-Dade Police Detective Willie McFadden. 

Anyone with information on the case can call Crime Stoppers at (305) 471-8477.

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